Writing in the Time of Covid

I tend to shy away from making sweeping statements. However, I think I have one that everyone will agree with: The pandemic changed everybody’s life.

Among other things, the pandemic made me rethink what I write. I started looking at a bigger picture. Re detective fiction, I’m working on a new series. The novel I finished during the pandemic doesn’t fit into it. It takes time to scope out a series and to get the pieces – the individual novels – right.

The new series is plugged into the current zeitgeist. Through the guise of fiction, the series will tackle topics like societal greed – without sacrificing the core of detective stories: the whodunit. As for timing, I’m not sure when the first novel will come out. As is its wont, the pandemic “retimed” everything. I’m aiming for next year, but whatever will be will be. Que será, será. I’m on pandemic time.

New Series – Book One: Chapters ONE to FIVE

Chapters ONE to FIVE from Book One of a new series set in New England. Download (free) to your preferred eReader/device.

New Fiction by Installment

North Noir is posting free installments of Book One of a new series. Click HERE for installments.

Kudos for North Noir I, Bay of Blood:

“A vivid page-turner” ~ Steven Heighton, Governor General’s Award Winner | “Quintessential Canadian mystery” ~ Lesley Choyce, Dartmouth Book Award Winner

Dark Angels

To some, crime noir is a subgenre set in grim urban environments, featuring petty criminals and desperate characters, permeated by a sense of disillusionment. I favour a wider lens. In the North Noir (Detective Naslund) series, crime noir is less bleak. It is more like life itself: not always dark, not always light.

Crime noir is linked to film noir, to movies such as The Maltese Falcon, which was first a novel. In a noir detective novel, the main character is sharp-witted and/or sharp-tongued. No quarter is given. Criminals try to rig the system, but fail.

Of course, noir detectives aren’t lily white. They cross lines, some more egregious than others, which they breach for the sake of efficiency or to apprehend criminals. Noir detectives are crime fiction’s dark angels. They know darkness, but follow the light.

Crime Time: A Two-headed Compulsion

Why do writers write crime novels? Why do readers read them? We’d have to delve into the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). 😉 We’d need a thousand hours – no, a million.

Let’s look at things from the reader’s side of the page. That’s what really matters: why readers read, not why writers write. It’s a large question. However, I’m going to take a succinct approach. Crime fiction suffuses the zeitgeist. Crime readers have favourite styles: cozy mystery, private investigator, police procedural, etc. Regardless, they’re all fascinated with one thing. Murder. Why?

I see it as a two-headed compulsion. One, readers want to experience the other side of life: death. Two, they want to experience fear. They crave it, but only fictionally: fear of the unknown, fear of the invader, fear of reprisal, fear of something that will disrupt their life – or end it. Fictionally, of course.

PS: Book sellers claim that everything hinges on sales, i.e., on book buyers. I beg to differ. Buyers are great, but everything hinges on readers. Period. That includes those who borrow from libraries or share a book a dozen times. The more shares (the more readers), the merrier.