Are Movies Better than Books? (The Dragon Tattoo Trilogy)

Are movies based on books ever better than the books themselves? Some people claim that books are always better than movies. Let’s look at a case from Swedish noir: Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy (aka, the Dragon Tattoo Trilogy).

The books were a huge sensation. No debate there. However, the movies are far  better (the three versions shot in Sweden). They have depth and complexity. As critics like to say, they live and breathe. You see the inhumanity. You feel Lizbeth Salander’s anger and disgust. And when you read the books? You don’t. The English translations suffer from stilted prose. The plots seem plodding and mundane. Relatively speaking, the books are dead wood.

Perhaps I can blame the book translations from Swedish to English? Perhaps. Unfortunately, I can’t read Swedish, so I can’t say. However, I can say that I’d watch the movies again. I will never read the English translations again. Movies: Three. Books: Zero. A lopsided win. And a shutout, as we Canucks say.

(PS: In my opinion, the Dragon Tattoo Trilogy is an exception. Books usually win. Hey, I’m in the writers’ union.)

2 thoughts on “Are Movies Better than Books? (The Dragon Tattoo Trilogy)”

  1. […] Blunt’s Detective John Cardinal novels have been turned into a TV series. I’m not a fan of the series, but I don’t blame Blunt. The TV offerings don’t deliver the vibrancy and depth of the Cardinal novels, a prime example of the general rule that books are better than the movies/series based on them. Of course, every rule has its exceptions (Are Movies Better Than Books?). […]

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  2. […] I’m not the only person who thinks Vanderhaeghe is a master. He’s won three Governor-General’s Awards for Fiction (one was for The Englishman’s Boy). His prose has been lauded by many. For example, Rick Salutin extolled its virtues in the ‘Globe and Mail,’ claiming that Vanderhaeghe’s sentences were works of art (I’m paraphrasing Salutin). The Englishman’s Boy was turned into a mini-series (which was almost as good as the novel). That is a tribute to the plot, and is a rare thing in itself – see: Are Movies Better Than Books? […]

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